Lola at the Copa: An Intuitive Piece of Art

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Lola at the Copa
“LOLA”

Who is Lola at the Copa?

Most people like listening to music from their past, oldies. I grew up in the 70s but  not a fan of music from that decade recorded on vinyl or 8-track tapes. The other day, Barry Manilow’s song, “Copacabana” popped into my head and played over and over again. Yes, Lola at the Copa began to  perform loud and clear. Buy why? At first, I thought it was a message from the Universe telling me to take a trip to Rio or Cuba (places I’ve always wanted to visit). The next thought, how to eject the torturous 8-track from my mind.

The only feasible remedy that came to mind was to create a piece of art around the song in the hopes it would  bring relief; My “Lola” was the result.

About the Song

Manilow says that the song was written in just fifteen minutes. Something interesting I discovered was that the song was a rather downer. The music appears to be upbeat on the surface, however, the words are dark. They describe a woman, Lola, the showgirl, who went stark-raving made after her bartender boyfriend was shot and killed.  Thirty years later, the showgirl remains insane. Barry won his first and only Grammy and the song was an international success. 

Meet Lola, my interpretation of a stark-raving mad Rio showgirl.

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Easter at the Philadelphia Museum of Art’s International Pop Art Exhibit

[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][rev_slider_vc alias=”pop_art”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text]This past Easter I opted to break from the traditional family dinner, the same menu consisting of  ham, pineapple stuffing and potatoe saIad with the side of lasagna that marks our Sicilian heritage. I decided to change things up a bit and spent Easter at thePhiladelphia Museum of Art’s International Pop Art Exhibit. Even though I am not a huge fan of Pop Art, I was intrigued by the international element of the show and the cohesiveness of the presentation.

A SPLASH OF HISTORY

The Pop Art movement began in Britain during the mid-1950s and late 50s in America.  The noted pioneers include Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg from the United States, and Richard Hamilton and Eduardo Paolozzi from Britain. The 50s and 60s, like most historical periods, were a time of global change in art, industry, politics, and many other areas that affect society.[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text][/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text][/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text][/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text][/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text][/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text][/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text][/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text][/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text][/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text][/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text][/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text][/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text][/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text][/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text][/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Cartographic Art – Not Just the art of making maps

[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_single_image image=”1089″ link_type=”no-link”][vc_column_text]Dating back 2000 years, the Phoenicians used cartographic art to record their travels. In the second century AD, an Alexandrian astronomer, Claudius Prolemy used this art form to record studies of the earth and world beyond. Subsequently, he created a well-known masterpiece, Geographia.

Cartography is known as a form of map-making, which became famous during the Post Renaissance period – the time of discovery and exploration – a period of astounding advances in science and technology.

The definition of this art form has changed throughout the years from the United Nations’ definition  – “science” in 1949 to “an art” science in 1973. Today it is defined as neither art nor science. I became intrigued which led my research to a very interesting Belgian artist, Pierre Alechinsky, born October 19, 1927.The piece in this post is one of Pierre’s works. His works can be seen at the MoMa in NYC and some listed on ArtNet.

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